Pre-Ordering allows us to streamline our picking process to insure you are getting the freshest and best quality fruit when you want it. 

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10 LBS.
 MESH BAGS

$14.00

Perfect for a couple or for mandarin lovers. Our 10 lbs. mesh bags hold an average of about 40+ mandarins per bag.   

 
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20 LBS.
PAPER BAG
$26.00

This family favorite will typically last a household of four about a week. Our 20 lbs. has on average about 90+ mandarins per bag.

 
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7 LBS.
SHIPPING BOX
$34.00

A perfect holiday gift for family or friends for the holidays. We ship via the USPS to most places within the continental United States.

 

We do what we love and we love what we do namely growing the best tasting Satsuma Mandarins in Placer County. 

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OUR ORCHARD

Since 1956 when our first Owari Satsuma Mandarin tree were planted, three generations of Strubles have farmed what are now 330 citrus trees. Our Mandarin trees are planted on a southern slope to gather optimal sunlight in the Fall, and to reduce any frost potential in the Winter. Our trees are grafted to a Cleopatra root stock, a hardier variety of citrus, which creates larger trees that can survive a cooler climate. 

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CITRUS CROPS

We grow and sell three different citrus crop varietals. Beginning with our signature Owari Satsuma Mandarins known for their exquisite taste and easy pealing.Weather dependent, we generally harvest mandarins from November till December. Our second harvest varietal consists of Clementines, a cross between mandarins and navel oranges, harvested from December though January. Our final harvest in February includes our delicious Navel Oranges. 

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FARMING PRACTICES

We are not a certified Organic Farm, because we choose to feed the tree’s foliage with natural supplements of Zinc, Magnesium, and Iron. Also in late February, a balanced fertilizer is spread to feed the shallow roots and stimulate new growth.  Pesticides are NOT used on our trees. We irrigate on a 12 day rotation cycles during the summer months. The sweetness of the fruit depends on letting picked fruit set for a few days so that the starches turn to sugar, and the mandarins are ready for sale. 

BARN QUILTS

   A barn quilt is a colorful quilt pattern painted on a 4’ x 4’ piece of plywood and mounted to a barn or historical building.  In 2012, Jan Struble painted the ranches first barn quilt, Citrus Beauty, and with Jim’s help, it was hung on their 100 year old barn.  Later that year two more Barn Quilts were put on display at the ranch.   In 2013, Jan organized the Loomis Basin Barn Quilt Committee which has designed, painted, and publicized 15 barn quilts which now hang on several barns throughout the Loomis area.  The Barn Quilt Trail Map is available at the Struble Ranch giving the locations of the other local barn quilts.

 The view of the ranch from Dick Cook Road as you turn onto Hansen Road.

 The view of the ranch from Dick Cook Road as you turn onto Hansen Road.

“ Struble Ranch is a place I am definitely going to return to. There is something about the history, dedication and family that turned this land in Loomis into a magical gift not only for generations of Strubles, it’s a place for generations of local families too. “

        - Heather Palmer
          FARM TOTS BLOG

The Struble farm house was built in 1913.

The Struble farm house was built in 1913.

Struble's have been selling mandarin from the farm since 1961.

Struble's have been selling mandarin from the farm since 1961.

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FIRST GENERATION

In 1918, Marion Rufus Struble purchased our farm from the original owner, Dick Cook.  Mr. Cook was part-owner of a saloon in Loomis.  The ranch at that time was named Alta Vista, high view, because of the spectacular 360-degree view from the top of the hill where the farmhouse was built.    

Second Generation

In 1934, Harold buys the farm from his father and marries his high school sweetheart, Ruth Edgell.  They move into the house on the hill that had sat empty for 16 years.  They raise their two sons, Bill and Jim, on the farm and live on the property for over 60 years. In 1956, Harold and two other local farmers first planted Owari Satsuma Mandarin orchards in order to diversify their deciduous fruit ranches. Currently, three generations of Struble have farmed the land in Loomis. In 1961, Harold and his sons harvest and sell their first mandarin crop.  They were sold in brown paper bags out of the family garage to neighbors and friends.  This tradition still continues today.

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THIRD GENERATION

In 1976 Jim and Jan Struble move to the ranch, and in 1984, a second and larger block of Mandarin Oranges, as well as Clementine Mandarins, and Navel Orange trees were planted. Today, the farm is managed by Jim and Jan Struble.  The farming tradition is continuing on into the fourth generation of Struble, as they enter their 54th citrus harvest.